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in my frustration of the zine scene (or lackthereof) in my university and the city where i live, im thinking of hosting a zine workshop... anyone know any good materials previously made before? im looking for ideas and resources.
thanks!

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I have 3 zines that might help:

Let's DIY 1 [Tips and Tricks on Organizing Zine Workshops] and 2 [Off the Page: Taking Zine-Making to the Community]
and #2 of Citizeen: How to Make Community

Girl Zines A-Go-Go makes Let's DIY, here's here website and email: gzagg.org info@gzagg.org

And Citizeen has a mailing address:

Katin Imes/Citizeen
16055 SW Walker Rd, #406
Beaverton, OR 97006
for about two years i made a zine workshop in a uni in Peru too.
what do you need i think is :
* a lot of paper (white and coloured paper)
* siccors
* ton of glue
* old magazines (no matter what kind of)
* very important :if the uni can give you a copymachine would be perfect
* colours
*pencils
* pens
*if you have some old pictures
* old newspapers

you can write that as a list that everyone can bring or you can offer this to the people that is taking the class

i hope i helped you a little bit :)
My main hurdle is conveying the politics of zine culture in the particular region I live in

Hobart, Tasmania is a small capital city, isolated from mainland Australia. They are literally PARANOID of zines. I have the DIY workshop zines as a guide, but they are written from a punk DIY perspective. As much as I tend towards this angle, it's nt so easy to explain these tenets to a more contemporary audience; a post-feminist/pomo/third wave group of people, especially as zines have become more mainstream.

How do I explain the parameters of freedom and responsibiltiy, involving no intellectual property, the point of it all, to these people? its harder than you would think. a lot of people dont get it. i had a helluva time trying ot find somewhere to put my zine library for example. its all considerd a liability.

at my last workshop, this mainstream entrepreneur freaky woman turned up, and ended up trying to stop me from launching the zine, claming that the group had stolen her intellectual property. hence, explaing these parameters is really important.
I really hear you.  I live in in Vancouver, WA USA which is only 20 miles away from Portland, OR--perhaps the zine mecca of the world.  It's ironic, however, how most people have not heard of zines in this city (Vancouver) unless they're really on the cutting edge of creativity...Which excludes about 90% of the population, a generous estimate.  Everybody in my hometown does facebook, facebook, facebook and treats zines as if they're a wasted effort.  The question I find myself asking is which is more of a wasted effort: writing or drawing a zine that you can hold in your hand and worship or poking about on facebook saying things that will be completely irrelevant to everybody in a matter of days.  It is hard to convey the knowledge us zinesters have when we're facing mass oppression.  I'm trying my best to start a zine program at a local mental health center, but all I can do right now is keep my fingers crossed.

womans monthly said:
My main hurdle is conveying the politics of zine culture in the particular region I live in

Hobart, Tasmania is a small capital city, isolated from mainland Australia. They are literally PARANOID of zines. I have the DIY workshop zines as a guide, but they are written from a punk DIY perspective. As much as I tend towards this angle, it's nt so easy to explain these tenets to a more contemporary audience; a post-feminist/pomo/third wave group of people, especially as zines have become more mainstream.

How do I explain the parameters of freedom and responsibiltiy, involving no intellectual property, the point of it all, to these people? its harder than you would think. a lot of people dont get it. i had a helluva time trying ot find somewhere to put my zine library for example. its all considerd a liability.

at my last workshop, this mainstream entrepreneur freaky woman turned up, and ended up trying to stop me from launching the zine, claming that the group had stolen her intellectual property. hence, explaing these parameters is really important.

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