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okay so i don't know if this will make sense but i am just throwing it out there. i am wondering what people think of the idea of therapists working with adolescents/young people giving out zines for clients to read? this would be done in order to help them cope/get insight into their own problems. there are a lot of great zines about mental health issues, body image issues, relationship issues and more that i think would be really beneficial to an adolescent going through a hard time...

i of course don't know the boundary/ethical implications of this but i think it would be a cool idea to look into..

i am working on a degree in mental health counseling and plan to become a therapist. i have a couple years left of school but think this is something i would want to pursue one day as a therapeutic avenue and i just wanted to get people's input on the subject...
maybe i could have a mini zine library of mental health related zines in my office for clients to read as homework?

any thoughts?

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Replies to This Discussion

I also don't know about the boundaries that therapists are held to, but this idea is great enough that it is definitely worth looking into! I think it would be a positive thing for the patient, to read about what others are going through and know that they are not alone. I also think it's a great way for therapists to connect with their patients in a fun and enjoyable way. I was just talking to someone about how many people view therapists as bland and out of touch (which may not be true, but it seems to be a stereotype that we've noticed). You would totally be a rad therapist. ;)
Just wanted to chime in that I think this is a great idea. I've had three therapists so far, and not one of them seemed to really "get" me. If a therapist read mental health zines, I think that would make her a much better therapist. And if a therapist shared mental health zines with her clients, I think that would be even better. I am all for this!
thanks for the feedback. i am interested in exploring this topic..i think zines could be a great resource to those struggling with mental health issues..particularly young people and those who don't fit into conventional sources of therapy. i really think therapy needs to be more dynamic and incorporate more creative interventions...perhaps zines could be one of these interventions.
This is a great idea! Adolescents (especially) need to be exposed to whatever artistic means of expressing themselves there are possible. I was diagnosed with disorganized schizophrenia at age 14, and led a very alienated 4 years of High School which I (somehow) graduated from. I did play the piano in jazz band, which was a great outlet, but I was still unable to put the necessary words to my illness. If there's any way I can help you out w/this, let me know!

--Nick Kessler

KellyRose-Pulse Zine said:
thanks for the feedback. i am interested in exploring this topic..i think zines could be a great resource to those struggling with mental health issues..particularly young people and those who don't fit into conventional sources of therapy. i really think therapy needs to be more dynamic and incorporate more creative interventions...perhaps zines could be one of these interventions.
I actually work at a mental health agency in their public relations department. I'm currently starting up a zine for people with mental illness. One of my target audiences is teens. I am encouraging teens to submit to my zine and my therapists are all for the idea of handing these out.....
I think this sounds like a great idea, and not just for teens/adolescents. One problem with one-on-one therapy sessions is that clients/patients are isolated and don't really get a chance to interact or learn about other people with the same problems. I don't know about the ethical implications though...
on the surface, it seems like a good idea... it's different--interesting. but then again, it might be unprofessional? see the thing about zines is that it is personal, free, raw. some things that we write are things that we never really give a second thought (now that is a generalization), in the spur of the moment; while we were feeling those emotions. these raw kinds of writings may be suggestive; triggering. something most (if not all) therapists try to avoid. if anything, maybe a book on what zines are and maybe suggesting zine-making as a medium for therapy might be helpful... but as far as handing out zines, it might be risky.

i see therapy as an active thing. when i was having issues, i knew i didn't appreciate people telling me how they dealt with things and overcome them--it made me angry; even jealous. and every depressing story i would read was something i could relate to. not necessarily in a good way: it had the tendency to amplify what i felt; made me angry, sometimes depressed. but hey that's just me. i dont know, really.

i'm actually planning to to do the reverse by sharing my zine with my counselor. i'm hoping something good will come out of sharing something so personal to me. i even explained to my psychiatrist what zines are & she checked out my Etsy shop just to see what i've been doing with my time.

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