We Make Zines

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What type of modus you use to make a zine?



There are many ways in which we know to make a zine which includes a way to write by hand, using a typewriter, computer, and may also be carved, and
so forth.
So here, the way that you always use to build your zine? And
what is your mode of which, if we use the computer, what type of
software is always used, whether you buy or steal, or if using a
typewriter, are you using any kind of machinery, carbon is such and such
or whether you use a pen or writing
with a foot or so? And what is your reason for using these modes of carrying out your plan? Presumably, such as technical recipes that can make a zine to share with us here.

Tags: able, about, books, by, comics, computer, defend, diy, e-zine, free, More…hand, internet, material, noble, present, reason, recipe, scene, software, technical, typewriter, zeen, zine

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I prefer using a computer, which is the method that made me more diligent to write no matter at any time even in the bathroom. I'm not hard to do things like using scissors and glue to work pasting and cutting, so I decided to type on a computer. Despite the lack of flexibility, but I tried to master the software I use is the maximum to get what I want in my paper. Now I use the Microsoft Office 2010 for carrying out my duties as enforcers of chaos.
I think it's easier to write on a computer and easier to read text from a computer, so I made my zines on the computer. I use Open Office, a free alternative to Microsoft Office. I use their Writer program for 8 x 5.5 zines and their Draw program for smaller zines. (And then I just use a decent laser printer, sometimes a paper cutter, and a long-arm stapler.)
My first two zines were produced mainly using a typewriter, with some hand written and drawn things, and then scanned and printed at home using my mono laser printer. Works pretty well, but I've been keen to try other methods, so I've just produced a zine using a 1981-vintage Sinclair ZX81 computer.

I'm keen to try other things - I'd really like to use a spirit duplicator, but they seem VERY hard to come by these days.
For my Fucus Zine (a comic & illustration zine) I used to draw all the images by hand, then scan them, vectorialize them using an old version of Corel Draw a friend passed to me, arrange them in pages and print them in A5 zine format.

If not, for my Manual zine (a mainly text zine of useful tips) I write all the tips anywhere (yes, anywhere), then I write and lay the text quickly on the computer using Inkscape (an open source design program) before printing it in a single sheet.

Lately, I've been introducing other manual methods on my zines, such as block printing for the covers, hand made rubber stamps (I make them carving erasers) and sewn binding (instead of staples). I've also discovered that drawing with ink and a brush is more interesting that doing it with a marker (even if it takes much more time). And that's all.
all of you are great and creative....
This is how I do most of my zines, like 80% of the time. My last two issues were done on typewriter, then cut and paste.

Harley R. Pageot said:
I type up all the text on the computer using Microsoft Word as my handwriting isn't great. Then I print it off, cut out paragraphs, and do everything else cut and paste style with scissors and gluesticks.

I prefer sitting on the ground at the coffee table working while watching TV rather than staring at a computer screen for hours on end.
I think it's good to mix things up. There used to be a zine called "Something For Nothing", by Idy, out of Ohio. He did around 50 issues of it, and never charged for it (hence the title). Every issue I'd get seemed to be a different format, size, etc, and it was always really fun, especially if you collected a lot of them. I've tried to take on that mentality.

For the past 2 months I've been putting together Proof I Exist #13, and it's turned into quite a challenge. I'm doing a limited run of only 113 copies, but each one will be unique. I've used my computer, my typewriter, several rubber stamps, stickers, individual glue-sticking in each copy, spray paint for color, and sewing machines to add pieces of fabric. It's an art project as much as a zine, but I like that it will be totally weird when it's done. (yet still have lots of writing and stories).
I've been testing out a few lino printed pages recently, once you've got the blocks made up it's so quick and cheap to make prints from.
Kinda prefere actual print and gloopy ink bits to computer printing too.
Billy Da Bunny said:
I think it's good to mix things up. There used to be a zine called "Something For Nothing", by Idy, out of Ohio. He did around 50 issues of it, and never charged for it (hence the title). Every issue I'd get seemed to be a different format, size, etc, and it was always really fun, especially if you collected a lot of them. I've tried to take on that mentality.

For the past 2 months I've been putting together Proof I Exist #13, and it's turned into quite a challenge. I'm doing a limited run of only 113 copies, but each one will be unique. I've used my computer, my typewriter, several rubber stamps, stickers, individual glue-sticking in each copy, spray paint for color, and sewing machines to add pieces of fabric. It's an art project as much as a zine, but I like that it will be totally weird when it's done. (yet still have lots of writing and stories).

That's brilliant. I'd love to trade/buy a copy when you get it all finished.
-Skunk.
Most of the writing for my zines gets done in simple Mac-based programs like Text Edit. I also do some of it in e-mail applications like Gmail, which allows me access to the things I'm working on regardless of the computer I'm using (home or work). Images are mostly altered, cropped and sized in Photoshop. Page layouts are mostly done in an old version of Quark Xpress that one of my teachers bootlegged for me when I graduated design school. For two of my zines that were more image based, I did 90% of the layouts in Photoshop.

To add a tactile element, the covers of many of my zines feature a red ink stamp designed by combining an African coin with a bracelet that an old girlfriend gave me with Chinese calligraphy on it.
quite good to share about...

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