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is there a college/university-centered zine anywhere?

I got this summer program packet from Parsons School of Design, which totally reved me up (and even made me quite obsessive about getting into an intensive summer program) except I think it's too expensive. while i understand that studying in ny is meant to be expensive, i still think roughly 6000USD for a month-long summer program is kind of insane!

This made me wonder if there's any zinester's guide to finding the right college... or a guide to funding college.... or a zine that debates whether it's even worth it to take classes on courses like art and literature or if people thinks this is an innate talent... i just thought it would be an interesting read...

feel free to suggest any art schools or give your views about higher education in art...

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I've never seen a zine on this subject. Most likely because there is a TON of information on this sort of thing out there already.
I've never seen a zinester's guide to finding the right college - (((why not take your search beyond the world of zines - if you are pursuing higher education you should start getting used to getting your information from sources other than zines. Do some research in a library - talk to the librarians, use the internet and talk to friends and colleagues who have done or are doing what you want to do))) - but here's my advice.

(A) FINDING THE RIGHT COLLEGE
(1) You are the most important determining factor in your own education - where ever you wind up - that is the best place not because of the college's reputation - but because YOU are there and where ever you are THAT is the place to be.
(2) Money is a factor - go to a place that gives you a good value - live in a city where you get the most for what money you have.
(3) Visit the college before you make up your mind - talk with people there - see how it fits you - pay attention to your own feelings about each place you visit (visit at least three colleges)

(B) FUNDING FOR COLLEGE
(1) organize your taxes and finances
(2) apply for student loans from the government
(3) apply for grants and scholarships
(4) attempt to get money from other sources
(5) don't use credit cards
(6) get a job and save up money
(7) get a job on campus to help pay bills - become a resident assistant in the dorms for free room and board (and possibly a stipend)
(8) ultimately go into some significant debt which you will be able to pay off once you leave college and join the work force - (choosing a well researched career path knowing the average salary and job benefits - also research what employers in that job are looking for in applicants; information which should help you shape any extra-curricular activities you pursue in what little freetime you may have)

(C) IS TAKING ART AND LITERATURE CLASSES "WORTH IT"
(1) First decide what you want to do later in life - you have to be very honest and very specific with yourself - and when I say be specific, I mean - BE SPECIFIC. The more specific you are, the better you will be able to steer the direction of your education.
(2) Based on what you want to do, decide you want to learn - again be specific!!!
(3) Once you decide what you specifically want to learn, ask yourself what is the best way for yourself to learn this.
(4) At this point it should be self-evident if taking art and literature classes are "worth it"
(5) Or here's another way of saying it: is taking art and lit classes worth it?: probably not, not because it's an innate talent, but because the chances of turning the knowledge and skills you learn into money after graduation are not so great - so it's not worth it from a finanical point of view... and in the end, isn't that why you are persuing college in the first place? Or is it for another reason?

(D) RECOMMENDED ART SCHOOLS:
(1) University of Iowa - (that's where I got my degree... though I should warn you that their art department is currently being housed in an abandoned Menards)
(2) Refer to (A)(1)

(E) VIEWS ON HIGHER EDUCATION
(1) The more (energy) you put into something, the more you will get more out of it.
(2) If you are not learning now, you'll be learning later - (or you'll be dead) - so you might as well learn now.
(3) Learning can and will take place when & where you least expect it (it happens only occasionally in a classroom - ALL THE TIME outside of classrooms)
(4) In any class, you will learn more about what is not on the curriculum, than what is on the curriculum.
(5) If I am not for myself, who will be for me? - If I am only for myself, what am I? - and - If not now, when?
I think you'll have more luck with websites to be honest. I'm not in the US, so I can't help with specifics, but I'm sure there are websites which collect all the scholarship and bursary details together (because after all, university in the US is so insanely expensive), and give students' opinions of their courses, maybe someone else here can provide the addresses.

My only advice is to choose your specific art course very carefully. I don't know if the system's the same in the US, but here art is a 4 year course, and the first year is foundation, where you have to try out as many mediums as possible with no pressure for results, and then you pick your specialisation for the BA which follows. Two of my friends chose fine art as their specialisation because they were told it was the most flexible option, but then they found themselves being pressurised to do nothing but video installations. A good way to check out art colleges as well is to go to the finalists' exhibitions in the summer and see what you think of the work coming out of that art college. If nothing in the exhibition speaks to you, perhaps you wouldn't be happy at that art college.

My friend in america went to the Maine College of Art and had a good experience, but by her final year found Portland, Maine a bit claustrophobically small. She's a professional artist now and doing well, so it can be done. You can check out her work here www.ohmycavalier.com

Have a good think about whether you want to live in a big city or a small town. If you go to art college in New York, your living costs will be horrible, but you will meet a lot of interesting artistic people. Also as well, if you attend college in your home state it's a lot cheaper, am I right?
well, i've actually browsed through websites and university and program guides... but i guess i just wanted to see what most zinesters thought about college and/or taking formal art or lierature classes in a formal or university setting, really.
first, thanks for your insighful response :)

Bradley Adita said:
I've never seen a zinester's guide to finding the right college - (((why not take your search beyond the world of zines - if you are pursuing higher education you should start getting used to getting your information from sources other than zines. Do some research in a library - talk to the librarians, use the internet and talk to friends and colleagues who have done or are doing what you want to do))) - but here's my advice.


Like i said, these are things that I've already done. The truth is that I am already in a uniiversity...and have been since 2006--but something as indulgent as taking a humanities class is something i haven't done... snd since I'm graduating from my degree this May (hopefully) I'm looking into a good intensive summer program to reward myself with and hopefully help me decide if it's something i'd also want to pursue as a secont degree and/or career.

>

(A) FINDING THE RIGHT COLLEGE
(1) You are the most important determining factor in your own education - where ever you wind up - that is the best place not because of the college's reputation - but because YOU are there and where ever you are THAT is the place to be.
(2) Money is a factor - go to a place that gives you a good value - live in a city where you get the most for what money you have.
(3) Visit the college before you make up your mind - talk with people there - see how it fits you - pay attention to your own feelings about each place you visit (visit at least three colleges)

(B) FUNDING FOR COLLEGE
(1) organize your taxes and finances
(2) apply for student loans from the government
(3) apply for grants and scholarships
(4) attempt to get money from other sources
(5) don't use credit cards
(6) get a job and save up money
(7) get a job on campus to help pay bills - become a resident assistant in the dorms for free room and board (and possibly a stipend)
(8) ultimately go into some significant debt which you will be able to pay off once you leave college and join the work force - (choosing a well researched career path knowing the average salary and job benefits - also research what employers in that job are looking for in applicants; information which should help you shape any extra-curricular activities you pursue in what little freetime you may have)

(C) IS TAKING ART AND LITERATURE CLASSES "WORTH IT"
(1) First decide what you want to do later in life - you have to be very honest and very specific with yourself - and when I say be specific, I mean - BE SPECIFIC. The more specific you are, the better you will be able to steer the direction of your education.
(2) Based on what you want to do, decide you want to learn - again be specific!!!
(3) Once you decide what you specifically want to learn, ask yourself what is the best way for yourself to learn this.
(4) At this point it should be self-evident if taking art and literature classes are "worth it"
(5) Or here's another way of saying it: is taking art and lit classes worth it?: probably not, not because it's an innate talent, but because the chances of turning the knowledge and skills you learn into money after graduation are not so great - so it's not worth it from a finanical point of view... and in the end, isn't that why you are persuing college in the first place? Or is it for another reason?

(D) RECOMMENDED ART SCHOOLS:
(1) University of Iowa - (that's where I got my degree... though I should warn you that their art department is currently being housed in an abandoned Menards)
(2) Refer to (A)(1)

(E) VIEWS ON HIGHER EDUCATION
(1) The more (energy) you put into something, the more you will get more out of it.
(2) If you are not learning now, you'll be learning later - (or you'll be dead) - so you might as well learn now.
(3) Learning can and will take place when & where you least expect it (it happens only occasionally in a classroom - ALL THE TIME outside of classrooms)
(4) In any class, you will learn more about what is not on the curriculum, than what is on the curriculum.
(5) If I am not for myself, who will be for me? - If I am only for myself, what am I? - and - If not now, when?
Personally I have the world's most pointless degree- Classics. So basically I'm qualified to translate latin poems and write essays about the sex lives of various roman emperors. It' s bit different here though, because all the unis are public, and you don't have to shell out/borrow vast amounts of cash. So there's not the same calculations involved. I feel for you though, it's so hard to decide what to do when the amount of money riding on your decision is so huge.
it's insane, right? and on top of that, a higher education in arts and humanities does not have a forseeable future... or so my family claims

Zacery / I'm Not Lion said:
How much?! This is why I won't be furthering my education, shame really.
i think it's pretty cool and brave though to do something you just want/feel like. i'd do anything for a degree in classics that do what I'm doing right now... but then again, they are paying for my education so i guess its only fair they choose what i do? hah. and this is why i am really determined to indulge myself in an art or lit-related intensive summer program right after i graduate in may...

Emma Jane Falconer said:
Personally I have the world's most pointless degree- Classics. So basically I'm qualified to translate latin poems and write essays about the sex lives of various roman emperors. It' s bit different here though, because all the unis are public, and you don't have to shell out/borrow vast amounts of cash. So there's not the same calculations involved. I feel for you though, it's so hard to decide what to do when the amount of money riding on your decision is so huge.
you see I've been in the university since 2006... I've tried different fields in 2 different universities in 2 completely different countries trying to find something i want to do--but in vain (Im graduating soon though so yay!) and i guess I wanted to get into a summer program to try a completely different field from my will-be degree.

also, about finances, i guess my situation is kind of different since I'm an international student and the USA sets certain rules on where and how much you can work if you're an international student...

Bradley Adita said:
(C) IS TAKING ART AND LITERATURE CLASSES "WORTH IT"
(1) First decide what you want to do later in life - you have to be very honest and very specific with yourself - and when I say be specific, I mean - BE SPECIFIC. The more specific you are, the better you will be able to steer the direction of your education.
(2) Based on what you want to do, decide you want to learn - again be specific!!!
(3) Once you decide what you specifically want to learn, ask yourself what is the best way for yourself to learn this.
(4) At this point it should be self-evident if taking art and literature classes are "worth it"
(5) Or here's another way of saying it: is taking art and lit classes worth it?: probably not, not because it's an innate talent, but because the chances of turning the knowledge and skills you learn into money after graduation are not so great - so it's not worth it from a finanical point of view... and in the end, isn't that why you are persuing college in the first place? Or is it for another reason?

(D) RECOMMENDED ART SCHOOLS:
(1) University of Iowa - (that's where I got my degree... though I should warn you that their art department is currently being housed in an abandoned Menards)
(2) Refer to (A)(1)

(E) VIEWS ON HIGHER EDUCATION
(1) The more (energy) you put into something, the more you will get more out of it.
(2) If you are not learning now, you'll be learning later - (or you'll be dead) - so you might as well learn now.
(3) Learning can and will take place when & where you least expect it (it happens only occasionally in a classroom - ALL THE TIME outside of classrooms)
(4) In any class, you will learn more about what is not on the curriculum, than what is on the curriculum.
(5) If I am not for myself, who will be for me? - If I am only for myself, what am I? - and - If not now, when?
Which country are you from originally?

I was a good girl, I did well enough in the school exams, and then went to university straight away, then I finished in the requisite three years. Originally I entered on a four year course which was joint Italian/Classics with an ERASMUS year in Italy, but the Italian classes were rubbish, so I switched to straight classics and a three year course. The system here's a lot less flexible, you don't accumulate credits so much as pass discrete years (which take 1 year full time, or 2 part time), but the lack of flexibility means that pretty much everyone finishes on schedule and on budget. It has its advantages and disadvantages you could say.
I'm from the Philippines. Grew up there and spent about 2 years worth of college there... and like you, i went straight from high school to the university as if i knew what i wanted and what i was getting myself into... which wasn't the case because up til now, i havent a clue what i want to do! haha.

i think my biggest problem is being a dreamer... it's hard for me to settle...

Emma Jane Falconer said:
Which country are you from originally?

I was a good girl, I did well enough in the school exams, and then went to university straight away, then I finished in the requisite three years. Originally I entered on a four year course which was joint Italian/Classics with an ERASMUS year in Italy, but the Italian classes were rubbish, so I switched to straight classics and a three year course. The system here's a lot less flexible, you don't accumulate credits so much as pass discrete years (which take 1 year full time, or 2 part time), but the lack of flexibility means that pretty much everyone finishes on schedule and on budget. It has its advantages and disadvantages you could say.

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