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When I use the computer to type text for zines I'm a big fan of Baskerville in pt 9/10, it looks warm and friendly, and reminds me of letterpress fonts and the font they used to use in 60s and 70s puffin children's books. For headers I pick one from the various more decorative fonts I've got, FT rosecube and Post Office and Unicorn are three favourites that go well with the baskerville (or I've got two sets of rubber stamp letters in retro looking fonts that me & Tukru found ultra cheap in an art shop, we wanted to buy loads of boxes of them the next time we were there, but they didn't sell them anymore)

I'm a bit stingy with my font size, I must admit, but that's because I want to maximise content to copy costs ratios without making it hard to read.

What are your favourite fonts to use?


(the files are the decorative fonts off my mac- I have no idea if they'll work on a pc)

Tags: fonts, layout, question

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I should add though that I do my layouts by cut and paste, I just preformat the text into blocks on the computer to cut out from the printed sheet. I find the physical cutting and pasting too fun to do the layout on the computer.
that's where I get mine from too
also check out www.chank.com a lot of their fonts are ones you have to pay for, but they do have quite a few great free ones

Zacery / I'm Not Lion said:
Oh my, I'm such a font whore, I love them.

All the fonts I use here are available on 'www.dafont.com', although I dunno how that site would work on a MAC.
My favorite decorative font is PupCat, which is what I use in the headers of my distro. But just for everyday use, I love Verdana or any non-messy typewriter font.
ooo, i love that rosecube one.

my favorite of the moment is:


and helvetica neue...


and that one too.
ooh i like that telegraphem one, I'll have to download it
the past three zines i've done, i wrote mostly the texts by hand. i found that to be alot easier..?
but shit, the next one i want to do more writing than drawing, and i think using an old fashioned typewriter would be sweet!!!XD i'd hate using the computer to write. internet is so damn distracting.
Perpetua is my favorite font, so I use it often. In my last zine, however, I used perpetua, hultog, my typewriter and some handwritten pieces.
ariel best...sans serif...legible from...6-11
How strange - i just came on WMZ specifically to start a discussion about fonts, and there's already one here!

I wanted to ask if people prefer to stick with one font consistently through a zine or use a variety??
I like to type my personal writing on the typewriter and do other article-type stuff on the computer to vary. I know its not thematically original in the zine world but I still love hand-typed cut and paste style fonts. Opinions?
american typewriter on the mac or powderfingertype on dafont.
but a real typewriter would ever be better...
I mainly hand-write or use a manual typewriter, but I do use the computer if I have a large piece already written that I want to put into a zine. I like the DIY ethic, though, so I keep the use of technology to a minimum. I do use the computer to print all my zines, though - I scan all the pages into a PDF and print them on my mono laser printer. It means I don't have to go out and photocopy them.
Arial 9-11 for most of the writing. I usually have insane amounts of content to jam in and still want to leave space for good-sized pieces of artwork or a photo or two on each page. Headings, all over the font map. I'm really liking a few of these people posted, so thanks! Time to boost up my font options again.

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